Craig Micchelli, PhD

Craig Micchelli, PhD

Associate Professor, Developmental Biology

The Micchelli lab investigates the molecular mechanisms controlling Drosophila stem cell fate decisions, and how these can inform our understanding of all stem cell systems.

 

Faculty profile »

Jeffrey Milbrandt, MD, PhD

Jeffrey Milbrandt, MD, PhD

James S. McDonnell Professor and Head of Genetics

The Milbrandt lab studies mechanisms that influence axonal degeneration and regeneration.

 

Milbrandt Lab website »

Timothy Miller, MD, PhD

Timothy Miller, MD, PhD

The David Clayson Professor of Neurology

The Miller lab aims to understand the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and to develop novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, especially ALS.

 

Miller Lab website »

Jeffrey Millman, PhD

Jeffrey Millman, PhD

Associate Professor; Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Lipid Research; Department of Medicine

The Millman lab investigates novel stem cell technology and biomedical engineering approaches for the treatment of diabetes.

 

Millman Lab website »

Mayssa Mokalled, PhD

Mayssa Mokalled, PhD

Assistant Professor, Developmental Biology

The Mokalled lab investigates mechanisms of spinal cord regeneration after injury or disease using zebrafish as a primary model.

 

Mokalled Lab website »

Josh Morgan, PhD

Josh Morgan, PhD

Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

The Morgan Lab studies the organization, development, degeneration, and regeneration of the synaptic organization of the visual system. We are currently focused on determining the extent to which microcircuitry in the visual thalamus can recover from denervation..

Morgan Lab website »

Samantha Morris, PhD

Samantha Morris, PhD

Associate Professor of Genetics and of Developmental Biology

The Morris lab studies the gene regulatory networks that define cell fate. This information is applied to engineer cell identity, and to better understand cell fate decisions in development and disease.

 

Morris Lab website »

Jeffrey Neil, MD, PhD

Jeffrey Neil, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Neurology

The Neil lab specializes in the use of MRI methods to evaluate brain development in animal models and human infants.

Neil Lab website »

Jeanne Nerbonne, PhD

Jeanne Nerbonne, PhD

Alumni Endowed Professor of Developmental Biology and of Medicine, Division of Cardiology

The Nerbonne lab studies the molecular mechanisms controlling the properties, the cell surface expression, and the function of voltage (K+) gated channels in the cardiovascular and nervous systems.

 

Nerbonne Lab website »

Regis O'Keefe, MD, PhD

Regis O'Keefe, MD, PhD

Fred C. Reynolds Professor and Head of Orthopedic Surgery

The O’Keefe lab studies skeletal development and repair, cancer, and inflammatory diseases of bone.

 

O'Keefe Lab website »

Arin Oestreich

Arin Oestreich

Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Dr. Oestreich's research focuses on how maternal obesity influences pregnancy health, fetal skeletal development, and the long term metabolic and musculoskeletal health of the adult offspring.

Faculty profile website »

David Ornitz, MD, PhD

David Ornitz, MD, PhD

Alumni Endowed Professor of Developmental Biology

The Ornitz lab investigates the functions of Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), their interactions with other signaling pathways, and their role in tissue regeneration, response to injury, and cancer.

 

Ornitz Lab website »

B. Duygu Ozpolat, PhD

B. Duygu Ozpolat, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology

If humans lose their reproductive cells (i.e eggs and sperm) they become infertile, in contrast, some animals regenerate their reproductive cells and reproductive organs. The Ozpolat lab's goal is to uncover the mechanisms of reproductive cell and tissue regeneration by identifying the cell types and genes involved in this process, which will inform regenerative medicine approaches.

Ozpolat lab website »

Randal Paniello, MD, PhD

Randal Paniello, MD, PhD

Professor, Otolaryngology

The Paniello lab is interested in using muscle stem cells to repair and treat vocal cord paralysis.

 

Paniello Lab website »

Rohit Pappu, PhD

Rohit Pappu, PhD

Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering

The Pappu Lab studies the molecular basis of neurodegeneration, phase transitions that lead to protein and RNA condensates driven by multivalent molecules, the biophysics of intrinsically disordered proteins, and design of responsive, protein-based biomaterials. This includes multiscale computer simulations, adaptations and developments of polymer physics theories, in vitro experiments, and collaborations that enable molecular and cellular level investigations.

Pappu Lab website »

Cecilia Pascual-Garrido, MD

Cecilia Pascual-Garrido, MD

Assistant Professor, Orthopedic Surgery

Dr. Pascual-Garrido’s lab focuses on stem cell therapies for cartilage regeneration.

 

Pascual-Garrdio Lab website »

Debabrata Patra, PhD

Debabrata Patra, PhD

Associate Professor, Orthopedic Surgery

The Patra lab is interested in identifying and analyzing regulatory pathways that impact skeletal development. In particular, the lab is exploring roles for the proprotein convertase Site-1 protease (S1P) in cartilage, bone, and spine development.

M. Farooq Rai, PhD

M. Farooq Rai, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopedic Surgery

Dr. Rai is interested in understanding the early molecular mechanisms that orchestrate changes in knee joint after injury and lead to the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

Gwendalyn Randolph, PhD

Gwendalyn Randolph, PhD

Professor, Pathology and Immunology

The Randolph Lab studies the development and diseases associated with monocytes, monocyte-derived cells, dendritic cells and vascular and lymphatic vessel biology.

 

Randolph Lab website »

Michael Rauchman, MDCM

Michael Rauchman, MDCM

Professor, Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine

Dr. Rauchman’s research focuses on understanding the molecular and genetic basis of mammalian kidney development, how disruption of specific pathways leads to abnormal development of this organ, the consequences of injury to adult kidney and the relationship between genetic mutations in humans and the development of future cardiovascular and renal disorders in humans.

 

Faculty profile »

Maria Remedi, PhD

Maria Remedi, PhD

Assistant Professor; Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Lipid Research; Department of Medicine

The major focus of the Remedi laboratory is to study in vivo physiology in various mouse models of diabetes to unravel the underlying mechanisms of pancreatic β-cell failure and their consequences in both pancreatic and extra-pancreatic tissues.

 

Remedi Lab website »

Stacey Rentschler, MD, PhD

Stacey Rentschler, MD, PhD

Associate Professor, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine

The Rentschler lab studies the molecular mechanisms of conduction cell specification and conductive disorders in heart biology.

 

Faculty profile »

Deborah  Rubin, MD

Deborah Rubin, MD

William B. Kountz Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine

The Rubin lab studies the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation, and carcinogenesis.

 

Faculty profile »

David Rudnick, PhD

David Rudnick, PhD

Associate Professor, Pediatrics

The Rudnick lab seeks to gain an understanding of liver regeneration to improve the treatment of children with liver disease.

 

Faculty profile »

Mark Sands, PhD

Mark Sands, PhD

Professor, Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine

The Sands lab studies the underlying pathophysiology of lysosomal storage diseases and develops therapies to treat them.

 

Faculty profile »

Timothy Schedl, PhD

Timothy Schedl, PhD

Professor, Genetics

The Schedl lab investigates how stem cells choose between self renewal and differentiation and how sex determination is controlled.

 

Schedl Lab website »

Erica L Scheller, DDS, PhD

Erica L Scheller, DDS, PhD

Executive Director, Center of Regenerative Medicine; Associate Professor of Medicine; Associate Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology

The Scheller laboratory synthesizes concepts from cell biology, physiology, and bioengineering to study the relationships between the nervous system and the skeleton. They have a directed interest in understanding how neural signals contribute to skeletal homeostasis, and how perturbations to this system contribute to bone loss, impaired healing, and altered regeneration. They also seek to understand how skeletal cells and proteins coordinate and regulate nerve regeneration in and on the bone.

Scheller Lab website »

Laura Schuettpelz, MD, PhD

Laura Schuettpelz, MD, PhD

Associate Professor, Pediatrics

The Schuettpelz lab studies how inflammatory signals regulate hematopoietic stem cells.

 

Schuettpelz Lab website »

Lori Setton, PhD

Lori Setton, PhD

Lucy & Stanley Lopata Distinguished Professor and Chair of Biomedical Engineering

The Setton Lab focuses on engineering and design of novel materials and drug depots to support regeneration of tissues of the musculoskeletal system.

 

Setton Lab website »

Lavinia Sheets, PhD

Lavinia Sheets, PhD

Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology

The Sheets lab uses zebrafish as a model system to understand how senory hair cells of the auditory system develop, degenerate, and regenerate. A main focus of the lab is to identify biological pathways that promote nerve regeneration and hair-cell reinnervation with the goal of providing information toward clinical regenerative therapies.

 

Sheets Lab website »

Hua  Shen, PhD

Hua Shen, PhD

Instructor, Orthopedic Surgery

Dr. Shen's group studies biological and mechanical factors that regulate tendon development, injury, and repair, as a basis to develop new therapeutic approaches to improve tendon healing.

 

Jie Shen, PhD

Jie Shen, PhD

Assistant Professor, Orthopedic Surgery

The Shen laboratory recently works on epigenetics of degenerative and regenerative processes in the muscuoskeletal system, e.g. osteoarthritis and bony fracture. They employ unbiased approaches to study the genomic and epigenomic alterations in skeletal diseases.

Matthew Silva, PhD

Matthew Silva, PhD

Julia and Walter R. Peterson Orthopaedic Research Professor, Orthopedic Surgery

The Silva lab studies the mechanical and molecular factors that regulate loading-induced bone formation and bone injury response and repair.

Jim Skeath, PhD

Jim Skeath, PhD

Professor, Genetics

The Skeath lab investigatesthe genetic and molecular basis of both asymmetric divisions and cell-type specific differentiation programs through the use of the Drosophila model system, focusing primarily on nervous system development.

 

Skeath Lab website »

Alison Snyder-Warwick, MD

Alison Snyder-Warwick, MD

Associate Professor, Department of Surgery

The Snyder-Warwick Lab investigates cellular signaling at the neuromuscular junction and the roles of terminal Schwann cells during development, disease, neural regeneration and muscular reinnervation, and aging. The goals of our work are to identify the mechanisms of terminal Schwann cell function that may be manipulated into novel translational applications for clinical management of patients with nerve pathology.

Snyder-Warwick Lab website »

Lilianna Solnica-Krezel, PhD

Lilianna Solnica-Krezel, PhD

Co-Director, Center of Regenerative Medicine; Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor and Head of Developmental Biology

The Solnica-Krezel lab studies the cellular and molecular genetic mechanisms underlying vertebrate gastrulation in zebrafish and human embryonic stem cells.

 

Solnica-Krezel Lab website »

Stephen Stone, MD

Stephen Stone, MD

Instructor, Department of Pediatrics

Dr. Stone studies the role of Fibroblast Growth Factors in Severe Insulin Resistance Syndromes. His research uses both murine and stem cell based models to better understand these rare and debilitating conditions, with the ultimate goal of providing new therapies for these patients.

Amber Stratman, PhD

Amber Stratman, PhD

Assistant Professor, Cell Biology & Physiology

The Stratman Lab is interesting in the mechanosensitive mechanisms that regulate tissue development and patterning, particularly of the cardiovascular system.  Utilizing zebrafish as a model, their goals focus on understanding developmental pathways that are reactivated during disease. 

 

Stratman Lab website »

Simon Tang, PhD

Simon Tang, PhD

Associate Professor, Orthopedic Surgery

The Tang lab integrates engineering and biology approaches to investigate mechanisms of degeneration relating to bone fragility and intervertebral disc degeneration, with an emphasis in the role of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and RAGE signaling on the cells and tissues of the skeletal system.

 

Tang Lab website »

Steven Teitelbaum, MD

Steven Teitelbaum, MD

Wilma and Roswell Messing Professor, Pathology & Immunology

The Teitelbaum lab investigates osteoclast development, function, and pathologies. 

 

Faculty profile »

Thorold Theunissen, PhD

Thorold Theunissen, PhD

Assistant Professor, Developmental Biology; co-Director Human Cells, Tissues, and Organoids Core

The Theunissen lab investigates the molecular mechanisms regulating distinct pluripotent stem cell states and their applications in regenerative medicine.

 

Theunissen Lab website »

Tony Tsai, MD, PhD

Tony Tsai, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Developmental Biology

The Tsai Lab is interested in the interplay between mechanical and biochemical signals underlying robust pattern formation and morphogenesis in the zebrafish embryos.

Tsai Lab website »

Fumihiko Urano, MD, PhD

Fumihiko Urano, MD, PhD

Samuel E. Schechter Professor, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipid Research, Department of Medicine

The Urano lab studies the molecular mechanisms of Wolfram Syndrome and investigates potential therapies.

 

Urano Lab website »

Deborah Veis, MD, PhD

Deborah Veis, MD, PhD

Professor, Division of Bone and Mineral Diseases, Department of Medicine

The Veis Laboratory studies NF-kB signaling pathways in bone cells, particularly in the context of pathological bone loss, such as in osteoporosis, inflammatory arthritis, and cancer metastasis to bone. A major focus is on the role of the alternative/non-canonical NF-kB pathway in osteoclasts, where it controls both differentiation and activity.

 

Veis Lab website »

Jessica Wagenseil, DSc

Jessica Wagenseil, DSc

Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science

The Wagenseil lab studies how mechanical stimuli regulate large artery formation and remodeling in development and disease.

 

Wagenseil Lab website »

Leyao Wang, PhD, MPH

Leyao Wang, PhD, MPH

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology

Dr. Leyao Wang's research focuses on lung microbiota and their role in lung inflammation and asthma. One of the lab's current direction is to establish a lung organoid system so that they can use this model to investigate the interactions between microbes and epithelium.

Wang Lab website »

Ting Wang, PhD

Ting Wang, PhD

Sanford C. and Karen P. Loewentheil Distinguished Professor, Genetics

The Wang lab focuses on understanding genetic and epigenetic factors that determine cell fate, including cell fate decision in normal development and differentiation, abnormal cell fate choice in cancer, and how specific cell types evolve.

 

Wang Lab website »

Mark Warchol, PhD

Mark Warchol, PhD

Professor, Otolaryngology

The Warchol lab studies the molecular mechanism underlying development and regeneration of sensory hair cells of the inner ear and their neurons.

 

Warchol Lab website »

Conrad (Chris) Weihl, MD, PhD

Conrad (Chris) Weihl, MD, PhD

Professor, Neurology

The Weihl lab studies neuromuscular disorders with special emphasis on degenerative myopathies.

 

Weihl Lab website »

Philip Williams, PhD

Philip Williams, PhD

Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

The Williams lab is interested in selective neuronal vulnerability in degeneration and trauma. We use a combination of in vivo microscopy, transcriptomics, and viral mediated gene overexpression/knockout to manipulate neurons in the retina with the long term goal of increasing neuronal survival and axon regeneration in degenerative mouse models.

 

Williams Lab website »